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  • River views from bed in the Boat Creek room.
  • Enjoy the Inn's cozy living room, fresh cookies, warm fire and river views.
  • All you can eat, cooked to order breakfast on the Klamath River.
  • The Requa Inn's dining room.
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  • Local organic food
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  • Stout Grove Loop Hike
  • Boy Scout Tree Trail, Redwood National Park, Jedidiah State Park
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The Inn

Aiy-yu-kwee'

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The town of Requa (pronounced Rek-wah) was a bustling fishing center on the Klamath River in the late 1800s when a hotel was first constructed to serve the Klamath's numerous fish cannieries. Although the bustling commercial center is now a sleepy village in the Redwood National Park, the Historic Requa Inn has been a feature of the area for almost 100 years. Built in 1914, the plain, almost utilitarian arts and crafts Bed and Breakfast continues to be a special place today. And this is a special place. Since time immemorial the Yurok people have had a village at Rek-woi - making Requa one of the longest, continuously inhabited places in California.

The Inn is in the heart of a series of co-managed redwood parks that have been declared both an International Biosphere Reserve and World Heritage Site. Welcome to our home, the Historic Requa Inn.

The Historic Requa Inn circa 1930

Your Innkeepers

Innkeepers at the Historic Requa Inn are Janet and Marty Wortman together with their daughter and son-in-law Geneva and Reweti Wiki and son Chef Thomas.  Jan, Geneva and Thomas are Yurok Indians, whose family has lived at the village of Requa since the beginning of time. The family purchased the Inn in 2010 and are happy to be home!

Having raised their children, Geneva and Thomas, in Oregon, Jan and Marty left their careers - and moved to Del Norte County in 2004. Marty often says, "the worst day at Requa is better than the very best day in Beaverton".

Together, we are one big happy family and we're passionate about sharing this wonderful Inn and our wonderful culture and place with you.

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We Love Our Old Inn

but there are some things you should know about staying in an old building in a remote town in northern California!

1.  Road:  a road runs in front of the Inn that is normally quiet but can get very busy during fishing season in August and September.  Locals also will drive well above the speed limit.  River Fronting Rooms are most affected, but most guests don't mind.
2.  Thin Walls:  The Inn is built of solid redwood with sawdust insultation- which isn't a great sound barrier.  Just know that you shouldn't share too many dark secrets while you're here!
3. No TVs or phones:  We don't have them in the rooms.  There is a guest phone in the lobby that requires a phone card for long distance.
4. Remote area: We are in the middle of a a world heritage site! It is remote and beautiful, which can also mean a loss of power in storms, unreliable internet access and limited access to some modern convienences (ATM's, espresso, dinner after 8pm). Enjoy the serenity!

  • Chef Thomas Wortman

Showcasing local, organic and Native foods in the dining room each night, Chef Thomas Wortman, Yurok Tribal member and co-owner of the Inn, is delighting guests with delicious and memorable cusine. Be sure to make dinner reservations with your stay!